Jesus Brings a Deeper, More Comprehensive Fix (Mark 1:40-45)

Christ cleansing a leper by Jean-Marie Melchior Doze, 1864.

Here we have what seems to be a familiar enough story.  As Jesus was going through all Galilee preaching in the synagogues and healing people, a man approaches Jesus with a particular need.  Up to this point, we might expect Jesus to say a word and heal the man.  After all, Jesus has places to go and people to see.  He just told his disciples that He couldn’t stay put long enough to meet the requests of everyone who had needs (Mark 1:35-39). But Jesus surprises us (you would think we might get more comfortable with this, even this early in the Gospel of Mark).

Jesus touches the man and he is healed.  Actually, he is “made clean.”  What vexed this man was he suffered from leprosy.  Today, we can distinguish between leprosy and other skin abnormalities, but in Jesus day, any skin related issue – deterioration, discoloration, deformity, etc. – would be labeled leprosy. According to the International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, “This disease in an especial manner rendered its victims unclean; even contact with a leper defiled whoever touched him, so while the cure of other diseases is called healing, that of leprosy is called cleansing.” According to Leviticus 13-14, anyone who suffered from the affliction was to be isolated and in effect quarantined in order to contain the spread of the disease.  Likewise, if anyone came in contact with someone suffering in this way, they themselves became “unclean” – a term not necessarily denoting that they became leprous, but at least susceptible to it and thus needing to “purify” themselves to become clean.  This man was not in that situation.

Most likely, he would have been living with the other “outcasts” – those who because of their unclean status were forced to live outside of the city walls.  It was common for these people to dwell in caves with others in similar situations.  If they had loved ones or deeply committed friends, they might have a visit occasionally with the visitor bringing some kind of food, often lowering it down into the cavern. This man had no basis for hope of escaping his stations whatsoever; at least not until Jesus shows up.

Imagine the obstacles he had to overcome to come to Jesus.  Wading through crowds of people that Jesus tended to attract, venturing into the city’s perimeter, even daring to cross the six foot perimeter he needed to maintain in order to approach this popular teacher and healer.

This man implores Jesus to heal him and make him clean. And Jesus is “moved with pity.”  The phrase is translated from a single word in the Greek, its splanxna, and it means “the inward parts,’ especially the nobler entrails – the heart, lungs, liver, and kidneys,” and eventually would come to denote “seat of the affections.”  Jesus sees this man and is moved in his inmost being.

Remember, Jesus can heal with a word; he has just done so in the verses preceding our passage here.  But here it says that Jesus “touches him,” and he is cleansed.  Why this peculiar detail?  Is it just a demonstrable flourish for Jesus?

To a man who has spent perhaps his entire life being isolated away from others, not able to participate in the community life, always making sure he kept his distance (or rather, feeling the awkwardness and emotional devastation of watching others adamantly avoid him), this man didn’t just need physical healing from the leprosy – he needed a more comprehensive healing.

He needed one that covered his physical (cleansing from leprosy), his emotional (the touch from another person) as well as his social and even spiritual needs.  Jesus goes on and doesn’t tell him to go on about his new life.  Instead, Jesus directs him to present himself to the “priest” and make the acceptable offering for his cleansing to him (Mark 1:44; cf. Leviticus 14:2-32).  Why bother with this at this point?  Jesus had healed him.  More to the point, Jesus is doing something so new and qualitatively different from the priests of his day – why bother sending the man there?

This was the accepted practice to be restored to the community at large.  Jesus was telling him to go through the official, proper channels, not in order to become clean, but in order to be seen as clean.  For Jesus, this is proof enough that the kingdom of God is at hand, and a new thing is being done in their midst.  There’s no need for the man to go out and make a big show of what happened.  Just go do what is necessary to be welcomed back into the life of the community.  But the man can’t help himself.  His deepest longings and wildest hopes have been met by this different kind of teacher, a different kind of healer, than even he had dared possible.

How could he not tell everyone bout it?